Love Works

Hello everyone,

It’s been quite awhile! I hope everyone is doing well, and is having a great holiday experience.

I’ve been taking a break from many things as of late. I’ve been given the opportunity to serve and take part in good causes lately, and have been focusing more on my family especially during the holiday season.

Also, I haven’t been blind to the issues that have been occurring in Ferguson, Staten Island, Cleveland and others. I’ve listened to stories like the one discussed between Scott Hanselman and Dr. Kortney Ziegler. I followed and reviewed information from both sides of Gamergate. I also discussed the issues that I saw personally.

I’ve been contemplating and meditating on these things, and have made some comments. However, I’ve been burdened to do more than sit back and just talk about the problem. The thing is that I love my neighbor. I love my neighbor to the point of action. And so, I’ve been thinking on what I can do as a software developer. Being given a great example by the ones who love me despite my flaws, and the groups that I discussed in the inequality post, I’ve decided to follow suit. Thus, the == (Equality) User Group has been created.

For the uninitiated, a single equal sign in many programming languages means assignment. If I have a variable called x, and I say x = 0, then I’m assigning 0 to x. However, a double equal sign is an equality operator. In that same example, if x is 0, when I ask if x == 0, I will receive a response of true. More info here.

This group will focus on teaching software development to peoples of all backgrounds, creeds, colors, genders, ages. At this group’s meetings, a safe learning environment will be sustained for any and all who wish to learn and collaborate with other developers. This will be a place where interview practice can be done to help acquire employment. This will be a meeting where we will do what we can to acquire resources for the sake of each individual’s career in software development.

This is my gift to you all this holiday season. Also, it’s a call to those who hear the same call to action as I have. Regardless of any excuse, you are welcome to come and assist. It will be appreciated, regardless of how small you think your contribution will be. Send me a note on any of my social sites or here in the comments with any ideas and/or if you wish to volunteer.

I will begin planning the first meeting once the holiday season has completed, and will post it on here and on my social sites once a date has been decided.

Thanks for reading!

Advertisements

Looking From Both Sides

Hello everyone,

I’m sure pretty much all of you have followed #GamerGate at this point, and may have seen some good conversations along with some pretty outrageous ones. With one of my previous posts talking about inequality, and witnessing inequality myself, I was initially inclined to immediately take the side of those who were screaming “INEQUALITY!”. However, I’ve learned in the past to look at both sides of conversations, as I am aware that people are capable of not being completely honest or overreacting, regardless of what side of the conversation they’re on. So, I kept my reservations until I was able to see both sides. This is when I saw this:

I initially was brought to this video after I read this:

After seeing both sides, I’ve come to a conclusion that I’ll reserve, mostly because people can be very unreasonable when they’re anonymous (as I’ve learned with my time gaming, on Youtube (especially comments) and doing tech support). I’ve shown my stance in my actions and on this blog, and hope that people will not blindly trust anything from either side of a conversation, but yet do research to ensure we focus our energy in the right places.

Thanks for reading!

Silently Enforced Inequality

Hello everyone,

I don’t particularly enjoy ruffling feathers or starting tough conversations, but I feel this is a necessary thing.

I’m the oldest of 5 children, but am the only Caucasian out of those 5. My stepfather is African American, and so is my uncle, and my cousins as well. I went to a high school that did and still does have a majority African American student body. I have two sisters, and I now have a daughter. My wife and both of my children have red hair and pale skin. For the most part, I am surrounded by and in love with some of the most disenfranchised groups of people in the U.S.

My beautiful family

My beautiful family


The coolest wife and kids I know :)

The coolest wife and kids I know 🙂

My experience with all these peoples is that they are no more unintelligent or ignorant than I am. They excel in some things that I’m just plain awful in. They are intelligent, passionate, and determined, just like any other peoples. They can often differ, just like any culture or people. They can often have their own style of talking, dressing, driving, eating, working and playing. But nonetheless, they are worthy of respect. As a matter of fact, they are not THEY. THEY are WE. We are humankind, with our own unique eccentricities and cultures and tongues and activities.

I make this point because there are some that look at my wife, daughter, sisters and mother and see someone that is only useful in the kitchen. There are some that look at my stepfather, uncle, cousins and siblings, and see people that are unworthy of nothing more than manual labor, lacking the ability to comprehend anything more than brute force and violence. There are some that look at my wife and kids and see a weak people, only worthy of being picked on and bullied. If it isn’t already obvious, these things concern me.

I went to a Girl Develop It meeting the other day. For those who haven’t gone before, it’s not a “no-man’s land”. It was created to emphasize that women are pretty scarce in the IT field, and to help teach women so they can learn software development skills. What I found there was highly intelligent women and a few men who came together to teach and learn. It was a great experience that I learned much from.

For quite awhile now, I’ve been following Black Girls Code. This group is not only fighting the troubles that women often run into, but also overcoming cultural stigmas concerning being of African descent. I sadly haven’t made it to one of their meetings, but I plan to in the near future.

Why is this important? Why should anyone care? Just look around in your development groups, and you’ll notice a trend: there are not a whole lot of these different peoples in nearly all development groups. This isn’t because these people don’t want to be software developers. If that was so, the groups I listed above wouldn’t exist. It’s because there is a silently enforced inequality that discourages them, and sometimes even prevents them completely from entering these circles. For someone who loves these people, that upsets me. I’m looking for a change.

So, instead of just talking about change, I’m going to push for it. I’ll be spending my time helping out with Girl Develop It. I’ll be looking to attend a Black Girls Code meeting. I’ll be encouraging my family to follow their passions and ignore those that think lowly of them. I’m even considering making a user group dedicated to respect and learning, regardless of background, color, culture, gender or life choices. I’ll need some help ironing out the details for that, so volunteers would be awesome :).

And that’s all I have for now. Please comment or send me a message if you have any questions or concerns, or would like to back me up on this.

Thanks for reading!